Indication

Migraine without aura (common migraine)

What is it?

Attacks come on without any prior warning and can vary in length (4 to 72 hours). Between attacks, there are no symptoms. The pain is violent, pulsating, usually on one side of the head and made worse by physical activity, often being accompanied by nausea or vomiting. Sufferers find noise and light difficult to tolerate.

Cefaly?

Is indicated when attacks are frequent (several times a month). Cefaly’s effectiveness will first and foremost be preventative in order to significantly reduce the frequency of migraine attacks. It can also reduce pain during an attack.

Benefit?

Significant improvement for 2 patients out of 3.

Migraine with aura

What is it?

The attack is preceded by an aura (neurological symptoms) such as tingling in one part of the body or a blind spot (scotoma) in the field of vision. The actual attack can then vary in length (4 to 72 hours). Between attacks, there are no symptoms. The pain is violent, pulsating, usually on one side of the head and made worse by physical activity, often being accompanied by nausea or vomiting. Sufferers find noise and light difficult to tolerate.

Cefaly?

Is indicated when attacks are frequent (several times a month). Cefaly’s effectiveness will first and foremost be preventative in order to significantly reduce the frequency of migraine attacks. It can also reduce pain during an attack.

Benefit?

Significant improvement for 2 patients out of 3.

Ocular migraine (Migraine with visual aura)

What is it?

The migraine attack is preceded by a visual aura which often appears in the form of a blind spot (scotoma) in the field of vision, sometimes with flashing outlines. Some patients also speak of an ophthalmic migraine when the pulsating pain of the attack is located around one eye.

Cefaly?

Is indicated when attacks are frequent (several times a month). Cefaly’s effectiveness will first and foremost be preventative in order to significantly reduce the frequency of migraine attacks. It can also reduce pain during an attack.

Benefit?

Significant improvement for 2 patients out of 3.

Episodic migraine

What is it?

These are migraines (common or with aura) that are characterised by attacks of varying length (4 to 72 hours). Between attacks, there are no symptoms. The frequency of the attacks varies, ranging from one per month (or less) to several times a week.

Cefaly?

Is indicated when attacks are frequent (several times a month). Cefaly’s effectiveness will first and foremost be preventative in order to significantly reduce the frequency of migraine attacks. It can also reduce pain during an attack.

Benefit?

Significant improvement for 2 patients out of 3.

Chronic migraine

What is it?

This is a migraine that has been ongoing for some time and the attacks from it have become very frequent. The headaches are present at least half of the time or more (the patient suffers headaches on more than 14 days in a month).

Cefaly?

Has proven its effectiveness in episodic migraines. For chronic migraines, we are not yet entirely sure – however many patients are satisfied with the effectiveness of Cefaly. Especially with the help it brings in reducing the consumption of medications.

Benefit?

Probable improvement for more than 50% of all cases.

Tension type headaches

What is it?

Tight or pressure-type pain, often described like a bar located on the left and right of the anterior part of the skull. Anterior tension type headaches do not get worse with physical activity, nor are they accompanied by vomiting or visual disturbances.

Cefaly?

The key indication for Cefaly is migraine, however data indicates that it can be extremely useful for some patients who have frontal tension headaches.

Benefit?

Significant improvement for more than 50% of all cases.

Cervicogenic occipital neuralgia

What is it?

This is an irritation or inflammation of the occipital nerve. The sharp pain is like a burn or electric shock, travelling from the top of the neck to the crown of the head. It starts at the cervical spine and is generally caused by arthrosis, lesions secondary to an accident (whiplash), etc. This type of neuralgia is not very common and is often confused with migraine when the pain starts in the occipital region.

Cefaly?

Cefaly has an occipital electrode (Arnold kit) that is designed to specifically work at the level of the major occipital nerve (or Arnold’s nerve).

Benefit?

Significant improvement for more than 50% of all cases.

Your Shopping Cart
Subtotal: $0.00  (0 items)
Your shopping cart is empty
Start Shopping!